Player's Handbook

Playing the Game

Playing the GUTS+ System requires only the occasional D6 roll and a bit of imagination.

The Basics

Role playing is a bit like collaborating with a group to tell a story with special rules in place that prevent the story from going too far off the rails. The GM sets up the world and the situation, and it’s up to you and your fellow players to work through that situation together using your characters.

Oftentimes, the GM will start a play session by describing a scene and some kind of circumstance that would bring your characters together for an adventure. It’s up to you as the players to ask questions both in character (IC) and out of character (OOC) and fill in the blanks so you can be as successful as possible when moving forward.

When your character asks questions and tries to perform certain actions, the GM will sometimes ask you to make a success check. Depending on what you are trying to roll success for, your stats may influence the outcome, raising your roll total by the value of the stat—the GM should tell you which stat to use if you don’t know.

You will occasionally roll for success against a non-playable character (NPC). The character being rolled against is the “defender.” Both you and the DM will roll, and whoever’s roll is higher wins. If you both roll the same number, then the person who is trying to succeed wins the roll.

As you continue playing, your characters will grow stronger, and the game will get harder. Just keep moving forward, and you’ll win eventually!

Handling Conflict

Conflict is the cornerstone of plot. The game you are playing will likely have a lot of different conflicts, often happening at the same time, as well as a lot of different kinds of conflicts. Whether you are trying to find someone’s lost cat or trying to work against a dictator, there are many different ways to go about handling conflict.

Conflicts are handled using a combination of die rolls and logical appeals made to the GM. When an appeal is not accepted by the GM, you must roll a number D6s to determine your success. See the Success Scale to understand how success is determined. When you begin, you will only be rolling 1 D6, but as your character grows stronger, you will need to roll more to keep up with the rising difficulty level.

Many role-playing games make heavy use of combat to overcome conflicts, but it might not always be the best option. Try different things to see what the best outcome might be. The GM should be flexible enough to handle whatever you throw at them and respond accordingly. If you come across someone acting strangely, instead of trying to beat the information out of them, maybe try to ask them what’s wrong.

Sometimes, though, Combat really is the only option.

Success Scale

How successful your character is at performing a certain action is determined by what number you roll on a D6 die. Occasionally, the DM will have you roll for a particular stat. In these cases, roll 1D6 plus an additional D6 for each Stat Point your character has—the number of dice you roll increases your chances at success (or failure) in both categories.

There are 2 types of success rolls: checks and contests.

Check

Check rolls are what determine your success at performing actions that do not involve other (unwilling) living creatures. Each individual die you roll is measured by this scale, which allows the GM to interpret the results based on what was rolled the most.

The scale for success is:

1 = Negative impact
2 = Failure
3 = Near success (GM decides)
4–5 = Full success
6 = Positive impact

For example, if you have 2 Stat Points in the Stat you are rolling to check, you would roll 3D6. If your die values were 4, 6, and 1, that equates to 1 Full Success, 1 Positive Impact, and 1 Negative Impact, which the GM could interpret as “Well, the Positive and Negative Impacts cancel out, which leaves a Full Success!” Or if you rolled 5, 2, and 4, then the result should clearly be a success because more successful dice were rolled than failures.

One last example in how these rolls could be interpreted is if you have 1 Stat Point and you roll 2D6 resulting in 1 and 5, then the GM should interpret that success as somewhere in the middle, i.e. a Near Success.

Contest

If you need to perform an action against an unwilling member, you will need to roll a contest against them. Both you and your opponent roll the relevant number of dice, and you subtract their die roll from yours (i.e. the defender subtracts their roll from the aggressor’s). The success scale is as follows:

less than -2 = Negative impact
-1–-2 = Failure
0 = Near success (GM decides)
1–3 = Full success
more than 3 = Positive impact

For example, if you are acting against an opponent and you roll a 6 and your opponent rolls 4, subtract your opponent’s roll from yours, which gives you 2. Your action would have Full Success, allowing the GM to progress the situation appropriately. If, alternatively, your opponent is acting against you, but they roll 3 while you roll 6, subtract your roll from your opponent’s, which gives you -3. Your opponent would have a Negative Impact failure, which would cause the GM to make something bad happen to your opponent instead.

Note: if you’re not proficient at doing math in your head, you can make the math easier by matching up the defender’s dice to the aggressor’s dice to see how much is left over. For example, the aggressor rolled a 3 and a 2 but the defender rolled a 5 and a 1—the 5 die can cover the values of both the 3 and the 2, leaving 1, resulting in a -1 Failure for the aggressor’s Contest roll.

“Near Success”

Whenever you roll a 3 check or a 0 contest, the result is at the discretion of the GM. They may take the opportunity to advance the situation somehow or they may decide that you need to roll better next time based on the context. Feel free to plead your case with the GM, though!

Using Stats

When rolling to determine success, the GM will tell you the base GUTS stat to use for your roll, and you can appeal to the GM to pair another relevant stat with the roll depending on the action you are taking. If the stat is relevant, add the other stat’s points to the base stat and roll as many dice as that allows, up to a maximum of 10 dice.

The GM will also give you advantages or disadvantages based on what stats are used in certain situations. For example, an action like pushing a boulder would use a Gumption roll, but without a stat like “weight lifting” or something similar, the GM would give you a certain amount of disadvantage to subtract from your roll. Using your “weight lifting” stat, even if it is at level 0, would remove any disadvantages.

Rolling Doubles

If any 2 dice are rolled with the same number, you may roll an additional die for each double rolled. For Check rolls, distribute the total value of the extra dice among the dice you rolled to increase their value and bring it closer to a successful result. For Contest rolls, simply add the value to your total roll to increase your chances at success.

Combat

If you do choose to handle your conflicts with violence, combat is a fairly straightforward affair. Characters take turns choosing who and how they want to attack in the order of highest to lowest Gumption roll. If there’s a tie in this roll, the GM will decide how the turn order will fall.

When you attack someone or something in the game, you need to declare what you are trying to do and then make a contest roll against your opponent. Depending on what you are trying to do, you will be using certain stats to determine how many dice to roll and how to augment your roll. The GM will tell you the result of your attack unless you roll well enough to make the decision yourself. Once your attack is done, the next person in the list makes their move.

Note that you can also choose to take any other action aside from attacking if you wish. Maybe you can defuse the situation instead! Or perhaps you have the ability to heal a partner’s injuries—that’s also something you can do on your turn!

Timing

Time spent differs from turn to turn depending on what action is done, but in general, most turns take about 5 seconds to complete in-game. Also, you can specify when your turn happens in relation to other turns that have already been taken, for example “at the same time as” another character is attacking one monster, you attack another, or right after a player knocked an enemy’s shield away, you take advantage of the opening in their defense.

Holding Your Turn

Sometimes, you will want to wait to perform an action until something else happens, for example, to perform a group attack or a counterattack or some other complex maneuver. You may hold your turn at any time, but if you do not use your held turn before your next turn comes around, you will have lost that turn.

Weapons

In order to use a weapon, your character must be holding it in their Hand (i.e. not in a Bag), and they must have a place to put anything that they might already be holding instead of their weapon. Beyond this, the effect of the weapon is governed by logic and the Success Scale. For example, using bare fists may not be very effective against metal unless you’ve got a really good reason as to why it actually would be, but a knife might be able to cut through some wood.

Taking Damage

When you are attacked and take damage, your character will receive injuries depending on where they were hit. See Health to learn about the health and injuries systems in GUTS+.

Completing Combat

Combat goes until the GM declares that the opponent has been defeated. This could be by knocking them out or making them run or otherwise convincing them to stop fighting.

Health

Most role-playing game systems utilize a “hit points” (HP) system, but in GUTS+, a character’s health is determined by the number of injuries sustained to various parts of their body and the strain placed upon their mind and body.

Injuries

The following chart shows the default areas of the body that can be injured and a baseline idea of how many times an injury can be sustained before it becomes fatal:

Injury Chart

Whenever you take an injury, mark it on your character sheet. If a part of the body sustains the maximum number of Minor injuries that it can have, the next Minor injury instantly becomes a Major injury, and if the maximum number of Major injuries is taken, use of that body part becomes limited and will affect what your character can do. If you receive any Major injuries beyond the maximum number, you lose use of that body part completely. Losing use of either of your character’s Hands reduces your inventory space, and “losing the use of” your character’s Head means your character immediately becomes unconscious.

If your character receives more than 6 Major (non-Head) injuries (i.e. 7 or more), they will fall unconscious. If they are not recovered before enough time passes, they will die, so be careful!

Strain

In addition to Injuries, performing a taxing action for a sustained period of time can add Strain to your character. If your character receives more than 10 points of Strain before they are able to remove any Strain, they can either receive injuries or be knocked unconscious from exertion.

Any additional strain received from performing actions inflicts a Minor injury to the body part that is performing it. If you are using magic, strain received inflicts injuries to the Head.

Recovery

Recovering from an injury is a relatively slow process if not deliberately focused on. Untreated, A minor injury will heal at the rate of 1 injury per in-game day—you choose what injury you wish to be healed—while a major injury will heal at the rate of 1 injury per 5 in-game days.

If you wish to focus on allowing your injuries to heal, resting will allow your injuries to heal twice as fast: 1 minor injury per 12 day and 1 major injury per 2 12 days. If you or someone in your group has any sort of medical stats, then they can help treat your wound to speed up recovery even more. Some treatments will be instantaneous while others might speed it up to just a couple of hours for recovery. Eating food can also help heal injuries.

Strain is slightly different: once the source of strain is removed, it begins going down immediately at a rate of approximately 1 point per minute. Depending on the type of strain and how soon you resume the stressful task, your strain might be removed all at once or after every couple of turns if in Combat.